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Science Daily: Dog News

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Many dog owners think of their furry companions as part of the family, and now products are available to feed them that way, too. Some owners are moving away from traditional extruded kibble products, instead choosing ultra-premium fresh and raw diets found in the refrigerated aisle. The foods may look more similar to what we'd feed a member of the family, but many of the newer diets haven't been rigorously tested for performance in dogs.xVY7NSdGNuE


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Scientists used genetic testing in over 900 shelter dogs to identify breed heritage in the largest study of its kind. The researchers found widespread genetic diversity: 125 breeds in the sample and an average of three breed matches per dog. The accuracy of shelter staff in identifying more than one breed in the dog's heritage based just on physical appearance was only 10 percent. How breed labels can impact shelter dogs is discussed.Jg6O6lKRAR8


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For nearly 60 years, the red fox has been teaching scientists about animal behavior. In a long-term experiment, Russian foxes have been selected for tameness or aggression, recreating the process of domestication from wolves to modern dogs in real time. Today, with the first-ever publication of the fox genome, scientists will begin to understand the genetic basis of tame and aggressive behaviors, which could shed light on human behavior, as well.fmPWoaRknHM


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Researchers have successfully attached miniature radio transmitters to kissing bugs and tracked their movements. Also known as triatomine bugs, kissing bugs transmit the pathogen that causes Chagas disease in humans and animals. They typically move at night and hide during day, and uncovering their secretive movements could play a key role in reducing their impact as a disease vector.VAADDBG_olA


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After wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the mid-1990s, some scientists thought the large predator reestablished a 'landscape of fear' that caused elk, the wolf's main prey, to avoid risky places where wolves killed them. But according to recent findings, Yellowstone's 'landscape of fear' is not as scary as first thought._rCXfSuwVys


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