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  1. Today
  2. Hillscreek

    Au Naturel

    Angus hasn't been stripped for more than two years. My friend brushes him now and then and once in a while she trims the hair over his eyes. His coat is very harsh on top and lays close over his thick soft undercoat. It is thickest over his shoulders. This is a working cairn's coat I always think. The coat of a cairn who runs in the mist and rain and digs into a tunnel to chase out its usually angry resident. He can run in any weather and his skin never gets wet. Snow and rain cannot pierce that thick cover. It always smells so sweet like no other dog's coat I've known. Of course there are many kinds of coats on our cairns softer, longer etc. Many modern cairns are much larger than in the past and have much longer outer coats which may need attention. There's no one way - they are all so different. Here's Angus when I stripped him regularly and nowadays. His coat is darker red now and he's got a lot more muscle on him with all that hunting and running. Then he was a pretty young fellow - now he's real (fairly) tough guy!
  3. pkcrossley

    Noodle!

    welcome, so glad you are getting into cairn world. and congratulations on your lovely noodle. she is going to take you for a raucous ride. congratulations!
  4. Yesterday
  5. Ripper70

    Noodle!

    Congratulations on your newest family member! This is a great site for information that you'll be searching for throughout your adventure with Noodle. I agree with Dianne! No Cairn forum introduction is complete without pics because...well, because we here, all love looking at pics of Cairns. Especially Cairn puppies!
  6. Sheep and dog bones can be whittled into orthopedic pins that stabilize pigeons' fractured wings, helping the fractures to heal properly without follow-up surgery. Researchers describe the treatment, which is cheaper and more efficient than using metal pins for pigeon rehabilitative surgeries. View the source article
  7. Sam I Am

    Au Naturel

    If one really thinks about it Mother Nature never meant us to “strip” or alter our Cairns coats very much as why do we alter so many breeds appearances? Would a good brushing not do? Are we just doing all this fussing about not for the animals sake but for our own idea of what a perfect Cairn looks like? PS.... I am chuckling because I am pretty sure Chuck(Idaho Cairns) would have jumped into this conversation, posting pictures of his fluffy pups Sammi and Bonnie.
  8. Kathryn

    Au Naturel

    Still love the "yak" look. Always tell our friend who strips the boys to "leave it long on the top." And she never does...sigh...
  9. Dianne

    Noodle!

    Welcome to the greatest Cairn forum! Amazing help and information. The first years are a whirlwind with Cairn puppies. Our first Cairn is Katie, now 2 1/2 . The first year was a happy challenge. The forum was invaluable in sharing information and suggestions. Be sure to post lots and lots of photos... can't get enough of those fuzzy faces! Cheers!
  10. SReagle

    Noodle!

    Hello, Everyone! Our family is over the moon about our Cairn puppy, Noodle! She is 3 months old & we have had her for three weeks. We were looking for a Maltipoo, but chose a Cairn instead. Why? Because her personality is amazing! Noodle is into everything, curious, & smart. We are working very hard at potty-training & she is catching on. I love Noodle because she is a tough little tomboy. No toy is big enough for her. She prefers the big dog toys to the cute, dainty ones. I’m so glad I found this forum so that I can learn about all things Cairn Terrier! We had a sweet Yorkie for 16 years & he passed away over the summer. His birthday was the same day that we got Noodle. We are just meant to be a terrier family. Dig & chase on!
  11. Last week
  12. Pepper Bug's Mom

    What is the purpose of stripping?

    I use the Mars comb and scissors and Pepper and Brodie hate getting groomed - especially the tummy area....
  13. Watch out for 'feather duvet lung' doctors have warned after treating a middle aged man with severe lung inflammation that developed soon after he bought feather-filled bedding. View the source article
  14. Sam I Am

    What is the purpose of stripping?

    If not showing Mars comb works great ..I also use thinning shears. Sam is not happy when having his coat stripped
  15. arevcindy

    What is the purpose of stripping?

    I had two groomers tell me that stripping is painful for the Dog and one of them flat out told me it was cruel . I know now that they just did not want to do it. I did find someone two towns over who is willing, but honestly, I have no idea if she really knows what she is doing. She does not regularly strip. I took Archie to her and bath, trim, nail clipping and partial strip was done in 45 min? Did not seem right to me and was expensive. Archie also seemed quite freaked out afterwards. After some research I decided to try a "mars coat king" deshedding tool. It cost less than one stripping so was worth a try. I love it! Carefully combed a ton of hair out of Archie and he did not mind it. I will probably take him in for light trimming etc and just use the coat king here at home. I am so glad I did not cave in and have him clipped when all the naysayers were convincing me there was no other way. Thinking of getting a smaller size CK for legs, face, tail.
  16. Kathryn

    Winston and Willow battle royale

    We have a similar romp here! I will try to get a matching video to show you how our guys do it...
  17. Hillscreek

    Winston and Willow battle royale

    Those guys know how to have fun!
  18. bradl

    Winston and Willow battle royale

    That's a day-brightener (despite the verticality ).
  19. Sam I Am

    Winston and Willow battle royale

    So Cairnish...stirring up trouble. 😎 love the sack bed your other pup dives into.
  20. WinstonTheTroutWizard

    Winston and Willow battle royale

    While organizing the old DVDs the other night, I was finally able to capture the nightly romp. Sorry for the vertical video!
  21. hheldorfer

    Au Naturel

    Nattie thinks he looks just fine. And is he available this weekend?😍
  22. Rss Bot

    Bathing Your Puppy: A Step-By-Step Guide

    Cute, cuddly, and full of personality, puppies might just be the key to happiness. But that happiness comes with a little bit of work, especially when it comes to bathing. Fortunately, there’s a way to make bath-time enjoyable for both you and your dog. Jennifer Bishop-Jenkins, an international certified master groomer and owner of Love Fur Dogs in Glencoe, Illinois, shares her insights on the best approach to bathing your puppy. Step 1: Determine Your Puppy’s Coat Type Before you even get your dog wet, figure out what type of shampoo and conditioner to use. This depends upon what type of fur your puppy has. Talk to your vet first to find out what products suit your puppy best. “Some coats need more minerals,” notes Bishop-Jenkins. “The short coats really need oil to the point of grease. Long-coated dogs need humectants [moisturizers].” Step 2: Provide Treats and Cuddles Bishop-Jenkins encourages her clients to start bathing their puppies as young as eight weeks old, as it establishes a life-long routine. But take it one step at a time. A puppy’s first visit to the groomer often doesn’t even consist of bathing. It simply serves to teach them that grooming isn’t scary. “We let the puppy run loose,” she explains. “We put them up on the table, put on a loud clipper, and run a light brush over them. There’s lots of treats, swaddling, and cuddling. We make them feel safe.” Step 3: Start With Lukewarm Water and a Rag There is no need to use cleansing products when the dog is very young. Be sure the water is lukewarm so that the ritual is pleasant for your puppy. No one wants a boiling hot bath and dogs are sensitive to heat. “Until the dog is three or four months old, all you really need to use is a warm wash rag,” says Bishop-Jenkins. “Dogs’ body temperatures run higher than ours. Their experience with temperature is different from ours.” Step 4: Graduate to Using Shampoo Once your puppy is at least three months old, it’s time to start using shampoo and conditioner. “Select shampoos and conditioners that are made for dogs and pH balanced,” says Bishop-Jenkins, who recommends plant-based products with no chemical additives. “And don’t buy the cheapest thing out there. I talk to professionals about getting the best professional type that I can get.” Step 5: Be Gentle “Bathing a puppy under six months old is very comparable to bathing a human infant,” says Bishop-Jenkins. “Puppies, like babies, aren’t used to the feeling. They can’t protect themselves.” Don’t scrub. Rather, use a very soft stream of water and gentle hand motions that move in the same direction that your puppy’s hair grows. Use this same direction when brushing and blow-drying. Step 4: Avoid Openings Around the Face No one wants soap in their eyes, including your puppy. Even tearless shampoos can irritate your dog’s eyes and you’ll also need to be careful around the ears, nose, and mouth. “Dogs’ ear canals are shaped like an L,” says Bishop-Jenkins. “If water gets down there, it gets trapped and causes ear infections.” She advises using minimal product around the face. Also, pinching the base of the ear shut using your thumb and forefinger when cleaning the face. Step 5: Rinse Thoroughly Your dog isn’t clean until the soap is actually rinsed away, Bishop-Jenkins points out. So give your dog a good rinse. “When you think you’ve rinsed enough then rinse some more,” she advises. “Get every molecule off your dog.” Step 6: Don’t Forget the Conditioner “Dogs’ skin and coats are the most important part of their body,” says Bishop-Jenkins. “Shampoo strips out moisture. Dogs need conditioner to keep their fur and skin from drying out.” Conditioner is just as important as shampoo. As you did with the shampoo, give your dog a full rinse to be sure all the conditioner is gone. Step 7: Blow Dry Time Once your puppy is clean and conditioned, give them a gentle blow dry, but don’t use any blow-dry cream or other styling aid. Once again, gentleness is key. Use a small handheld blow dryer on a low setting and brush your dog’s hair in the direction it grows. Step 8: Maintain a Bathing Routine Bathing should happen monthly, as your dog’s skin and fur get clogged up with oil and dirt over time. “Puppies are in training for a lifetime,” she says about the importance of getting your dog accustomed to bath-time. “You don’t train a puppy one time. You have to do it repeatedly, gently, minimally, and gradually, knowing you’re teaching them about an experience that they will have for the rest of their lives.” The post Bathing Your Puppy: A Step-By-Step Guide appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  23. bradl

    Au Naturel

    Agreed on all counts He's pulling the look off quite nicely, although I guess soon it will be you pulling his look off
  24. Earlier
  25. Sam I Am

    Au Naturel

    Definitely time for some serious grooming I am thinking. Must admit I am rather fond of the scruffy look but he is starting to resemble a sheepdog!
  26. There are a number of reasons dogs may not like playing fetch — including genetics and age Mix it up — try playing fetch with a variety of toys to increase your pup’s interest A great solution for many dogs is trying the “two toy” game Maybe your dog once loved playing fetch, but they’ve since lost interest. Or perhaps they never really enjoyed chasing after balls in the first place. Whatever the case, you may be wondering what’s going on, and why your dog doesn’t seem into fetch. Why Do Some Dogs Not Care About Fetch? While catch might seem like a universally loved dog activity, it’s normal for some dogs to simply not want to take part. Sometimes, it’s simply a matter of preference. “Just like not all people like a certain type of activity or sport, not all dogs like the same type of activity,” explains Heather White of Heather White Dog Training. “Some dogs may not have experienced being introduced to an activity like fetch in a way that they enjoy.” 1. Genetics may be at play. Some breeds — such as Labrador Retrievers, Golden Retrievers, Standard Poodles, German Shepherd Dogs, and German Shorthaired Pointers — have been bred with an internal drive to pick up items. But others may need some extra guidance to get started the hang of fetch. After all, dogs that have been bred for this ability have had the interest cultivated over centuries. That said, even if you have a dog from one of these breed groups, that doesn’t necessarily mean they “will automatically know how to retrieve and also want to,” says White. 2. A health issue could be getting in the way. “Some dogs who have previously enjoyed fetching items might begin to lose interest due to an underlying physical component, such as arthritis, which can impact the amount of enjoyment a dog has in fetching,” explains White. 3. Even if it once was fun, your dog can lose interest. “Dogs, just like people, repeat what they enjoy and what makes them feel good and happy,” says White. Some dogs might lose interest in fetch because they’re not getting enough positive reinforcement or enjoyment out of the activity. 4. They may not like the thing you’re trying to get them to fetch. Some dogs might “have specific preferences as to the types of items they enjoy picking up and retrieving back to their person, including the texture, shape, and even weight of an item,” explains White. If that’s the case, try mixing it up with other types of items, such as balls, stuffed toys, and dumbbells. 5. The dog will pick up the toy, but not bring it back. Certified dog trainer Penny Leigh says the most common problem she hears from owners is that the dog will run and pick up the toy but will not bring it to the owner. “The best solution for this is to play the two toys game,” says Leigh. “The dog picks up one toy and you immediately show them that you have another toy and they want to return to get that toy — or you can have treats and reward for giving you the toy with food.” This way, the dog does not feel like they are constantly giving up their prize, and they are constantly getting something in return. 6. They don’t understand how fetch works. Some dogs may simply be confused about what’s being asked of them when it’s time to play fetch. To teach your dog to fetch, White offers the following pointers: Take it: First, encourage your dog to move towards a toy and reward that first step with whatever your dog likes best (verbal praise, treats, or physical contact). Build to eventually having the dog touch the toy with their nose or mouth and finally taking the toy in their mouth Drop it: Here the goal is for your dog to learn how to give up the toy or item they’ve picked up and then being rewarded for doing so. Retrieving: Start by asking your dog to pick up an item that’s within a foot of you and encourage them to either drop it in front of you or deliver the item to your hand. Once your pup accomplishes this, you can start increasing the distance between them and the dropped item. Why Toy Drive Matters To figure out which type of activities your pet really enjoys, White suggests paying attention to toy drive when you play with your dog. Look for which types of toys your dog gravitates towards and whether they are more interested in the toy or your involvement and praise. Trying out different toys, different types of reinforcements and rewards, and different activities are all good ideas for helping increase toy drive. She suggests remembering that the overall goals of playtime are to: Get your dog’s activity and energy level up Keep things fun and safe Make sure your dog isn’t overly excited, tired, bored, or disinterested If fetch simply isn’t for your dog, White suggests considering the following alternatives sports and activity programs: Trick Dog — teach your dog new tricks and perform them in front of a judge Rally — a team sport where you and your dog navigate a course, side-by-side, perfmorning 10–20 skills. FAST CAT — a timed 100-yard dash, short for Coursing Ability Test. Scent Work —this one is all about the love of the sniff, where your dog will have to do some detective work and sniff out a variety of scents and substances. Agility — a race against the clock while completing an obstacle course. “Once you learn about what your dog enjoys, chances are good that there will be fun activities out there for you two to explore together,” says White. Best Fetch Toys If you’re looking to mix up the toys you play fetch with, check out these dog owner-approved items. Chuckit! Ultra Ball With nearly 7,000 positive reviews, the Chuckit! balls are a top choice for fetch and come in multiple sizes. Price: $5 JW Pet Company Chompion Dog Toy This durable dog toy in a dumbbell shape is made of natural and sturdy rubber and is ideal for both fetch and tug-of-war. Price: $8 KONG – Flyer Available in two different sizes, this soft rubber of this frisbee makes it ideal for teaching fetch. Price: $11 The post Why Does My Dog Not Care About Playing Fetch? appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  27. Pepper Bug's Mom

    Good bye

    He was a man of many talents!!! Such a sad loss...
  28. Dog owners want the absolute best for their canine companions to ensure they live healthy, happy, and active lives. The first step in achieving that goal is feeding your dog a balanced, nutritious diet. Historically, dry dog kibble and canned dog food were the only choices on the market. But over the years, raw food options have become increasingly available. Some brands, like Wellness® CORE, now even offer formulas featuring a blend of dry kibble with freeze-dried raw meats mixed right in. What food is right for your dog? You should always discuss your pet’s diet with your veterinarian. They will be familiar with your dog’s nutritional needs based on health, lifestyle, and exercise level. For example, working dogs, service dogs, and even show dogs, may have different caloric requirements than a more sedentary household pet. Raw Dog Food A raw dog food diet commonly consists of: Organ meats Muscle meat Whole or ground bone Raw eggs Dog-safe fresh fruits and vegetables Some dairy, such as yogurt Supporters of raw food claim the potential benefits to be: Shinier coats Healthier skin Improved dental health Increased energy Smaller stools Dog owners should be aware that feeding your pup a raw food diet may be more time consuming than giving them cooked, commercially-made dog food. Meticulous care is required in the handling, preparation, and sanitation of raw food. Also, a raw food diet is typically more expensive than a processed kibble diet. Raw food diets are not recommended in homes with small children or immunocompromised individuals. This is due to the health risk raw foods can present. For example, there have been multiple reports of recalls of certain raw dog foods due to contamination with salmonella, E-coli, campylobacter, and/or listeria. Dog owners should also know that the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has taken a formal position opposing the unregulated feeding of raw foods. Their policy states: “The AVMA discourages the feeding to cats and dogs of any animal-source protein that has not first been subjected to a process to eliminate pathogens, because of the risk of illness to cats and dogs as well as humans.” However, there are still many raw food diet advocates. If a dog owner elects to pursue this type of diet, find a veterinarian who is familiar with raw foods and can help guide you in the proper handling and cleaning required to prevent possible health concerns. Wellness® CORE® RawRev is one option that those interested in incorporating some raw into their dog’s diet may want to consider. Their high-protein formulas combine dry kibble with freeze-dried raw meat pieces, helping to take the guesswork and potential risks out of feeding raw. Dry Dog Kibble Dry food ingredients vary by brand, but all kibble dog foods are required to be balanced and meet the nutritional needs of a dog. In fact, the content, calories, and nutritional value of commercially prepared pet meals and treats are regulated by law. The ingredients in dry dog food kibble are processed together and cooked. These required ingredients include: Protein sources like beef, poultry, fish, and eggs Grains Cereals Vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants Supporters of dry dog food kibble claim the potential benefits to be: Reduced dental plaque Healthier gums Reduced risk of bacteria Easier storage Less risk of spoilage Cost-effective There are many dry dog foods available. As with all foods, reading the label will help you find the best possible brand for your dog. Always remember that the first ingredient is the most prevalent in that food. Look for a food that has a protein as the first ingredient, not a grain. The best dry dog foods have a single or novel source of protein, such as lamb, chicken, or salmon. Grain-free diets exist, but carbohydrates are required for energy, especially in rapidly growing, large-breed puppies and very active dogs. The choice of grain, however, is important. Some dogs may have sensitivities to wheat, corn, or soybeans. All dry dog foods need preservatives to prevent the fat from becoming rancid. Some commonly used preservatives have been controversial, such as ethoxyquin, BHA, and BHT. Dry foods tend to use more natural preservatives, such as tocopherols (vitamin E), citric acid (vitamin C), and rosemary extract. The shelf life of these foods may be affected, so always read the label on the bag and check the “best by” date. Avoid buying excessive amounts of food at one time if it will not be used in a timely fashion. Alternative Options While many dog owners exclusively feed either dry or raw, options now exist that provide the best of both worlds. Wellness CORE offers nutrient-dense, protein-packed dry dog foods that support whole-body health. Taking it a step further, the Wellness CORE RawRev line adds 100% freeze-dried raw meat pieces, like lamb and turkey, mixed in with dry kibble for a meal that dogs absolutely love. The result is a balanced, delectable formula for dogs, featuring high protein levels for optimal energy and lean muscles. What’s more, the inclusion of the omega-heavy raw meat pieces will help your dog develop a shiny, healthy coat worth showing off. So, if you’re thinking of starting to feed raw, but you’re intimated by the effort, expenses, and uncertainty involved, Wellness CORE RawRev is a great place to start. The post Raw Food vs. Kibble: What Should You Feed Your Dog? appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  29. Tuesday

    Good bye

    What a beautiful obituary! ❤️
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