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  1. Today
  2. pkcrossley

    Talk me out of it!

    what he said.
  3. Hillscreek

    Talk me out of it!

    Think pk speaks for lots of us. Sometimes Angus would drive me to the edge with his 'I know better than you' or 'Don't bother me now I'm busy attitude' But he was always so lively and so full of fun. I had to laugh and somehow we grew to be the greatest friends. Re coat My cairn's coat always smelled so fresh and sweet clean - no doggy" odor ever. If you can be with your pup most of the time and can stand the endless supervision needed for the first year or two. And if you can get all the family to be consistent relating to him then the most fun and loving buddy will be your reward. Good luck to you! arely had a bath. No"do
  4. Yesterday
  5. bradl

    Talk me out of it!

    And welcome! Don't forget to vote in the photo contests
  6. bradl

    Talk me out of it!

    Dog allergies indeed seem to fall along a continuum, rather than be yes/no. My wife will be nearly suffocated by a half-hour exposure to a room with a pet bird in it, yet we have lived with as many as six Cairns underfoot (two presently) and she reports no ill effects. She notes that she *does* experience slightly increased allergy symptoms when handling wee puppies (neonates to a couple weeks old). Meanwhile, her sister's Great Pyrenees will provoke more significant reactions after a couple hours. So while not hypo-allergenic per se, for Peggy Cairns are at least "low or minimal allergy." As to their personalities I find Cairns irresistible, irrepressible, and irreplaceable. Challenging, sure. But for terrier folk that's a feature, not a bug
  7. Sam I Am

    Talk me out of it!

    Firstly let me say that there is no such thing as a breed that does not shed dander. They all have skin cells that shed off. So if your wife has asthma I would do my research before adopting a dog...sounds harsh I know but many animals land back up in the shelter system for exactly that reason. You could always hang out in someone’s house where a dog lives and see how your wife reacts. Allergies are one thing however Asthma attacks are a far more serious issue. I totally agree with PK on all her points. Most terriers are not the ideal breed for first time owners. Cairns are free thinkers, they were bred to react to vermin on their own without their humans telling them what to do. A bored Cairn youngster left alone for hours spells trouble. Also they are incredibly smart and don’t take orders easily...there is a reason why a lot of terrier breeds don’t do well in obedience...that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen but you need to have amazing patience and a great sense of humour. Sam is our 3rd Cairn and our 5th terrier and he and his Scottish terrier room mate Rosie, never fail to keep me in stitches with their antics. They are characters for sure and keep us on our toes!We love our Cairns and Scottie’s. https://www.healthline.com/health-news/no-hypoallergenic-dogs
  8. sanford

    Talk me out of it!

    Hi Andy - and welcome to this wonderful forum. It is a valuable resource for any new cairn owner... And a source of first-hand information for questions you might not have even thought to ask! I was impressed with the questions you brought up, and as I read through them, I started to formulate a response, hoping I'd be able to keep it reasonably short, but to my relief, I discovered that pkcrossley had done the job for me. (She is the best when it comes to experience, intelligence, empathy and practical advice). You mentioned the virtue of adopting from a shelter, which is true. Another good option is to adopt from one of several cairn rescue groups. Colonal Potter Cairn Rescue is one that I adopted from. They are run by devoted volunteers across the country and the dogs are vetted and fostered so their behaviors, etc. are known. Some are mixes and some are full bred. This agency also gives a lot of support, backup and guidance to new, inexperienced owners. As a first-time cairn owner myself, I would offer you the possibility of considering an older dog as I did, one who is already house trained, whose habits and behaviors are known. (I adopted a 10 year old, and 7 years later, a 3 year old). Even though there is nothing cuter than a pup, we usually fall hopelessly in love with these remarkable companions no matter their age. This also relates to the mention of the words "trouble: or "problems" . No dog, regardless of breeding, etc. is completely trouble - or problem - free. But I say this in the context of raising children you adore... The love you have for each other makes the experience a fulfilling pleasure and a joy! You are correct to consider the expense. This was not as much of an issue in former times, but it is today. Due to advances in medical technology, escalating drug and vet costs, etc, $$$ is a realistic factor to consider. As per pk's advice above, a trainer for a first time owner of any breed can go a long way, helping you to gain confidence and skill and avoid errors. Please don't hesitate to ask more questions here. That's what we all do. You really do sound like you are on the right path in your search. Any dog you get would be lucky to have you!
  9. pkcrossley

    Talk me out of it!

    thanks for laying it out so clearly. the first question that comes to my mind is along these lines: it seems like you have not had a dog before, thus a cairn would be your first dog. this isn't usually recommended. raising a cairn requires patience, consistency, a sense of humor and above all iron-clad will power. I believe that if people are motivated --as you should be, since this puppy seems the perfect solution to your complex issues-- then the problems of a cairn as a first dog can be overcome. training: I think most cairns pick up house-training quickly, but it does mean that at least one adult will have to be on-hand 24 hours for a few days in order to get the basics instilled, and afterwards you will have to have your method in place (there are several to choose from) to follow up. to me there seems no question of comprehensive training of the dog without a trainer --you need a trainer (or excellent obedience classes), and they must be by a trainer who knows TERRIERS. non-terrier trainers, if my impression is correct, sometimes produce counter-productive results. I am convinced that many terriers, and above all cairns, are resistant to operant conditioning. they don't lose sight of cause and effect, and they turn over "commands" carefully in their minds before they decide to obey. you may also need some kind of doggy day-care (they are increasingly common) if you are both going to work during the day. cairn puppies are extremely active and the chances that a young puppy will patiently sleep or entertain itself with comical thoughts are zero. so, first, don't think of going into this all on your own. cairn living: it this is your first puppy, you need basic puppy-proofing of the house. you need to become neat, and not leave ANYTHING on the floor that you wish to not be in shreds or shards. with most puppies, and absolutely with cairns, this all applies to table tops too. be prepared to get a few tasteful puppy gates to control the dog's access to chosen parts of the house, whether you are home or not. all this applies to cairns but only more so. they will levitate themselves onto counter-tops, and climb over gates or fences like monkeys. they will open cupboard doors they can reach (fortunately most are never tall enough to get to door handles). light-weight garbage cans will all be toppled. they will gobble first and ask questions later, so any and all medications and vitamins but be kept very securely where they cannot get them. cairns can never left unattended outdoors, even in a well-fenced area. they will dig under wooden fences, and climb over chain-link fences. and I am with the portion of cairn owners who think they should never be off leash. even the most well-trained cairn may not be able to overcome their natural prey drive. a stray rabbit, skunk, cat, or wildlife, and your cairn can disappear unless you have a good harness and leash. most important, raising a cairn requires family solidarity that is not universal. when it is time to draw the line with your puppy, absolutely everybody in the household must be with the program. one dissenter, one slacker, and your cairn will exploit that. a cairn who remains hopeful of ruling the world is a misery to itself and everybody around it. your cairn must be happy and confident with you in charge. then it can relax and enjoy you. cairn minds and souls: these dogs are unbelievably smart, and you will have great difficulty trying to stay a step ahead. your puppy will think of ways to get into trouble that you can't possibly conceive of. they are also famously willful. they will keep trying to get round you and your rules with a persistence that will astonish you. only calm, no-fuss consistency on your part can defeat this (never get loud, angry or tearful, because to a cairn that just means success at pushing your buttons). your cairn must have absolutely no hope that he or she will find a way through your rules. if cairns are as smart as all that, why are they not at the top of the league for "intelligence"? because unlike shepherds, gun dogs, guard dogs and so on, terriers were not bred to take their orders from humans. they were bred to solve problems on their own, and do work --like finding and trapping vermin that are invisible inside walls or burrows-- involving problem-solving on the grand scale. your puppy will spend some time looking at you as the main problem to be solved. the sooner you can get across to the puppy that you are not going to solved, that you are not a problem but a partner for life, that you are strong, smart and trustworthy, the sooner you will have a fantastic friend and supporter in your cairn. if cairns are all that much trouble, why do people get them --and having had them, rarely get another kind of dog? that's how good they are. it is difficult to raise a cairn (and --not every single one, this is just a generalization), but if you do it right, by the time they are three (or thereabouts) you will have a companion of a sort you can hardly believe. they are loyal, empathetic, endlessly surprising, admirable, optimistic, and very funny. but what you get with a cairn you have to work for --you and your family will all be better people (I'm sure you're already very good) after you have successfully raised a cairn (and you would not be unusual if you quickly decided to raise two). over and over I see people here saying that while they love all their dogs, their relationships with their cairns are much deeper than they have achieved with any others. so, my impression is that this possibility is one that might not come along again for you, at least not with cairns. if you are informed about cairns and have considered what your family can do together, this could be just right. there are other dogs, and many have unique, amazing virtues (highest among them all, mutts). I think all cairn problems can be overcome with preparation and organization, and the problems turn out in the end to be very small in relation to the rewards.
  10. AndyB

    Talk me out of it!

    Okay, folks! I created an account on this forum just to get some group-armchair-psychotherapy. Our family has been saying for the longest time that we'd like to become dog owners, and yesterday a local adoption agency showed that they have four Cairn puppies, born 12/7, ready for adoption. We emailed them last night, but I want to be reassured that we're the right people for one of these pups, and that it's the right dog for us. The backstory: My wife and I love dogs. Our two daughters (10 and 8) love dogs. We've always planned to get one "someday." But there's always been some excuse not to get it yet. At first the girls were just too young—I've heard sources saying nobody should get a dog with children under the age of 5 (or 6, or 8, opinions vary). A couple of years ago my wife developed easily-triggered asthma, so we'd pretty much be looking at dander-free breeds. Up until this summer we lived in a townhome and said "we can't have a dog here"; now we moved to a house with a fenced in yard (and one of the talking points was "it would be good for a dog!"). Once we moved... between the new house and last year's trip to Disneyworld, wow, money is tight. And dogs are expensive. I've always had mixed feelings about how and where one goes about getting a dog. I know that the virtuous thing to do is to adopt from a shelter, and I've always kind of looked at people shopping for a specific breed as elitist eugenicists ("Oo, purebred, la di da!"). On the other hand, here we are looking for a very narrow selection of hypoallergenic breeds, and if you want to be sure of your dog's genetics, and don't want to involve puppy mills, then you're looking for a reputable breeder and probably running into big money. Waiting on a shelter or agency to have exactly the breed you want can be a long wait, and you of course often get older dogs with unknown history. Now, with these pups, it seems like the perfect conditions: They're terriers, thus are hypoallergenic. The pups were born in the care of the foster agency, so they've had a good environment from birth. You're getting a puppy so you have the chance to train it right. These pups in fact have enough not-Cairn to have some supposedly beneficial hybrid vigor (both parents are described as "Cairn mix," and their dad's ears are floppy). You're supporting a rescue, and last but not least paying less than $300 for the dog. Then I did some Googling—"so what's a Cairn Terrier anyway? Oo, cute!" (Googles "Cairn personality"—eyes widen.) I spent a half hour on this forum—"Are you sure you want a Cairn?" "Hang on for a wild ride—this ain't no lab!" "What were we thinking?" "Dingo Cairn ate my kitchen cabinet!!" Holy crap, I find myself thinking, are Cairns the "right dog" for anything other than hardened circus lion tamers? One other concern: We mentioned to an aunt the desire to eventually get a dog, and in her blunt way she said, "Oh, couples who both work should never get dogs." I wrote her off as extreme, but last night I saw the same sentiment somewhat more eloquently expounded, and I do worry whether we're the right family for a brand-new puppy (of any breed?). Now, in our defense, we both work in jobs with fairly lenient work-from-home policies. I'm a software developer (well, as of 2 years ago; for my entire adult life before that I was an underemployed professional violinist, but that's another story). In my current job, I don't think I'd ever have to go into the office more than three days a week, and usually spend only six hours of that day in the office. In fact, for the past month, I've been going in only 1 or 2 days a week. Fully remote jobs do exist in this field, and maybe I'd get one someday. My wife's job regularly lets her come home at 2pm to be here when the girls get off the school bus. So bottom line, the dog would alone as much as 6 hours at a time, three days a week—at most, and maybe both jobs would be more generous for a few weeks at the beginning. So what do you think? If we want to be ethical and caring people should we forget about dog ownership until at least one of us is fully remote? Is a Cairn too crazy for first-time dog owners? I'm both really excited and ready to jump for this opportunity and also a little scaredycat. This is your chance to "talk us out of it"—or, knowing that I have in fact stumbled into a bunch of people united by an ability to love Cairns (or is this in fact a support group to help those suffering from Cairns survive the experience?), to in fact talk us into it.
  11. pkcrossley

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Hey Sass you are one good looking lass. Enjoy your birthday, well done. Many happy returns.
  12. Last week
  13. Rss Bot

    Valvular Disease In Small Breed Dogs

    Heart failure, often brought on by valvular disease, is one of the most common causes of death amongst small breeds like Chihuahuas, Maltese, and others as they approach their twilight years. Here’s what you need to know about this disease and what you can do if you receive a diagnosis for your dog. What is Valvular Disease? First things first. Valvular disease is a complicated condition, with different stages and levels. The stages range from very mild to very severe. Only a veterinarian can make a diagnosis, and, once it is made, there are treatment strategies that are tailored to the individual dog’s needs. Small breeds are especially prone to developing valvular disease. “Small dogs get chronic degeneration of their heart valves, particularly two valves,” says Dr. Phil Fox, cardiologist at Animal Medical Center in New York City. “The mitral and tricuspid valves are most commonly affected. By the time some small dogs are 8 or 10 years old, you have some degree of that. Although, most of them don’t go on to heart failure.” When the valves weaken, they no longer close properly. When this happens, blood leaks around the valves and causes the heart to strain, according to Central Texas Veterinary Specialty & Emergency Hospital. “It’s undoubtedly genetic, but no one knows what the genetics of that are,” says Fox. Symptoms of Valvular Disease Fox explains that many dogs have no symptoms because, in most cases, the degeneration doesn’t result in heart failure. “Otherwise dogs would be gone in three generations,” he says. “They’ve been around since before the Egyptians. So, a small percentage are affected.” But if your dog does have valvular disease, some signs and symptoms can include: Weight loss Becoming weak or tired Losing the ability to exercise Fainting with excitement or during exercise In advanced cases, the lungs can fill up with water (also called pulmonary edema) or fluid can build up in their chest or abdominal cavity. Dogs can also experience a heart murmur that starts soft and gets louder as the years go by. This refers to an unusual sound heard when blood flowing through the heart is turbulent or abnormal. Often, there are no symptoms exhibited until the condition becomes advanced. What Can You Do To Help Your Dog? Fox says that small breed dog owners should take their pets to the veterinarian annually for a checkup. If the veterinarian hears a heart murmur or an irregular heartbeat, don’t panic. There are treatments available. From there, the vet can run additional tests including an X-ray or echocardiogram (an ultrasound of the heart) to determine the degree of severity of the valvular disease. He adds that pet owners should feel free to seek a second opinion. In some cases, that may mean referral to a specialist. For some dogs that have advanced valvular disease, but no symptoms, there are medications that the vet may prescribe for your dog. These include pimobendan, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, and spironolactone. With advancing valvular disease, the body tries to compensate, which provokes physiologic changes in dogs. Some of those are useful, but at times, the body overproduces these physiologic changes and they become problematic. The medications work in different ways to try to blunt or reduce adverse effects from what we would call excessive or abnormal physiologic changes. Considering Nutrition & Diet There are nutrition and dietary considerations too. But those recommendations are highly specific and should come from a vet. For instance, some vets may recommend a reduced-sodium diet. The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine provides a list of lower-sodium dog foods for pets with heart issues. “Nutrition and diet are very important, as it is with all conditions,” says Fox. “Diet should play a role in a discussion concerning heart health. There is a role in good nutrition, and it has to be coordinated with each individual’s pet circumstances.” When it comes to exercise, Fox says, in general, normal activity is OK — whatever “normal” might mean for your dog. But seek advice from your vet first. Above all, Fox says, don’t panic if your dog is diagnosed with valvular disease. “Find those remedies that put the pet in the best circumstance to prevail,” says Fox. The post Valvular Disease In Small Breed Dogs appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  14. Hillscreek

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Happy Birthday Gorgeous Girl!!!
  15. Kathryn

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Happy birthday, Sassy. Make sure you blow out all those candles on your cake and get everything you wish for. You deserve it all!
  16. sanford

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Happy birthday, Sassy. The queen herself couldn't look as regal and lovely as you, sitting in a toolbox!
  17. Pepper Bug's Mom

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Wow!!! Happy Birthday Sassy!!!!
  18. Tuesday

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Happy Birthday Sassy! ❤️❤️❤️
  19. bradl

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Happy Birthday Birthday Sassy! You look regal in your chariot.
  20. Ripper70

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Keepin' it classy, Sassy! You don't look a day over 4 years old!
  21. Sam I Am

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    How adorable you are Sassy. Happy birthday sweet girl! 💕
  22. hheldorfer

    Sassy is 15 years old today

    Wishing you the happiest of birthdays, Sassy! You look marvelous!
  23. hheldorfer

    Share your stories

    Yes, our seniors are loved and their wisdom is revered. Ziggy, the senior dog in our household, may not be around for much longer. We've gone through ups and downs over the past year, one minute thinking he was at death's door and the next watching him chase squirrels in the yard. His many health issues are now becoming overwhelming, however, and we know he'll soon tell us "I'm ready". The beautiful thing is that Nattie allowed Ziggy to be an alpha for the first time in his life. (Lord knows that could have never happened with Buffy in charge.) He proudly took on the role and taught Nattie the ropes while also being the protective big brother. Nattie will miss him when he's gone, but Ziggy has trained her well. One door closes and another opens.
  24. Kathryn

    Echo & Stella

    Interesting how their color changes as they grow older. Oban was about as light as Stella is in this photo when he was young, and now his face is completely black and his coat has darkened. He is 7. I remember how Allie darkened until she was 15, when we stopped stripping her and she was completely black, with some gray -- not brindle gray, but old age gray! She lived to over 16...
  25. Rss Bot

    Healthy Weight Gain For Puppies

    You’ve welcomed a new puppy into your home. Congratulations! Now what? In addition to enjoying snuggles, playtime and the challenges and rewards of puppy training, it’s up to you to make sure your dog gets the right amount of food and exercise. Keeping healthy weight gain on track helps ensure a smooth transition from puppyhood to full-grown dogs. To help you through this process, we’ve turned to Dr. Jerry Klein, Chief Veterinary Officer of the American Kennel Club, Dr. Lisa M. Freeman, veterinary nutritionist and professor of nutrition at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, and Dr. Sean J. Delaney, veterinary nutritionist and founder of Balance IT Nutrition. Healthy Diet & Exercise For Puppies Before you introduce your puppy to your home, discuss the proper diet for your pet with the breeder (if applicable) and your veterinarian at your puppy’s first vet visit. Keep in mind that changing your puppy’s food in the first few days could lead to added stress and may cause digestive issues, according to Dr. Klein. At this first appointment, the vet should help walk you through the basics of healthy feeding and exercise for puppies, including the following: 1. Feeding Puppies Dog Food Formulated By a Veterinary Nutritionist Make sure the label says “complete and balanced diet” per Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) certification. That means the food meets the minimum nutritional requirements needed for puppies. Generally, major well-known dog food brands should meet these criteria. 2. Understanding How Nutritional Needs Vary By Age and Breed Size Puppy nutrition needs differ from adult dog needs. Large and giant breeds also have different requirements than small-breed dogs. If you have a giant-breed puppy, you should find a food formulated for giant-breed puppies. 3. Not Overdoing It With Food “There is no need to supplement a diet that is already labeled as complete and balanced,” says Dr. Klein. Puppy owners should read and follow the food label’s feeding instructions based on their individual pet’s age and weight. Be sure to feed smaller servings more frequently, rather than too much all at once. Depending on your pet’s breed and size, you should feed your puppy three meals per day from two to six months of age. After that, you can transition to two times per day. Giant breed dogs, meanwhile, can be fed three times per day until about six to eight months. It’s a good idea to remove food bowls 30 minutes after placing them down and make sure water is always available. 4. Never Overexercising Puppies As a general rule of thumb, puppies should receive 10 minutes of exercise per day for every month of their age. For instance, 10 minutes at one month, 20 minutes at two months, and so forth. This amount of time can be spread throughout the day. Puppies should not be jogging or doing road work before their joints become fully fused. This often occurs between 12–16 months of age for many breeds, though, for giant breeds, it may not happen until 18–20 months. Otherwise, this type of exercise may lead to stress and health issues with joints and bones, says Dr. Klein. Recognize Signs of Healthy Weight Gain So what are some physical signs your puppy’s weight gain is on track? According to Dr. Delaney, your pet’s ribs should be easily felt and you should see a noticeable waistline when looking from the side and from above. In other words, if you have a hard time feeling your puppy’s ribs or observe a rounded belly, these are signs of overfeeding and that your puppy may be overweight. These are general guidelines that vary across breeds. An Azawakh, points out Dr. Klein, is built much differently than a St. Bernard. For best guidance, your veterinarian will be able to help accurately assess your puppy’s weight. Some of the most common mistakes Dr. Freeman sees when it comes to humans contributing to unhealthy puppy weight gain include: Switching To Adult Food Too Early “This is the biggest mistake I see,” says Dr. Freeman. “Growing small- and medium-breed puppies should be fed a puppy or all-life stages formula made by a well-established manufacturer until 12 months of age. Large- and giant-breed puppies should be fed a diet specifically designed for large-breed puppies until 12–18 months of age.” Not Knowing How Spaying or Neutering Reduces Calorie Requirements Once puppies have these procedures done, they don’t need to eat as much. So you should plan on reducing your puppy’s daily calorie intake. Doing so helps to keep your dog lean. However, still keep them on puppy food if they’re less than one year of age, according to Dr. Freeman. Letting Puppies Get Overweight or Grow Too Quickly “For optimal health of puppies — and to help them live a long, healthy life — it is critical to keep puppies lean throughout their growth period,” says Dr. Freeman, who recommends assessing your puppy’s weight frequently. Overfeeding Your Puppy According to these veterinary experts, overfeeding can lead to a life of health problems, with overweight puppies being more likely to become overweight or obese adult dogs. Overfeeding can also contribute to joint and orthopedic issues, and ultimately lead to a shorter lifespan. Know When To Visit The Vet If your puppy isn’t eating well, you should contact a veterinarian, says Dr. Klein. Otherwise, during this period of rapid growth, you should plan on taking your puppy to see the vet every three to four weeks, he adds. Routine visits early on can help prevent extra weight gain, as your vet can help you make adjustments to your puppy’s feeding and prevent longer-term impacts of being overweight or obese, says Dr. Delaney. The post Healthy Weight Gain For Puppies appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  26. pkcrossley

    Share your stories

    animals who reach a proper old age are a gift. they are an accomplishment, but old dogs also rely on their dog-being more intensely than ever before. dogs just celebrate being alive. they don't worry much about pain or disability, they just wake up in the morning and congratulate themselves on being here. good food, nice snuggles with family, that is all it takes for them to have "quality of life." they know so much about the point of being alive, and are willing to show us every day. neither of my cairns lived to enjoy old age, though all my other dogs did. I love the lives my cairns had, I just, personally, could have used a lot more for them. they are with me all the time, all their stubbornness and playfulness and seriousness and defiance and loyalty and sympathy. I think the successful seniors are living for all the cairns we lost too early. they are a joy, and a prize.
  27. Sam I Am

    Share your stories

    Kathryn I suspect a lot of us would.🥰 Stella ....sad that she is growing old but so sweet that she is living the good life. Aging animals are the dearest. My old horses were the calmest, safest and best rides ...although way past their peak show days, they were trusted and loved.
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