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  1. Today
  2. pkcrossley

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    Ruffy in charge. Dad, get up! I need you!
  3. Yesterday
  4. Last week
  5. bradl

    Great Pottery Throwdown

    HBO... Watched all three available seasons and LOVED every one.
  6. Dianne

    Looking for a puppy

    Sorry for your loss, Contact your local Cairn Terrier Club. https://cairnterrier.org/index.php/Breeders/list-by-state Best of luck.
  7. Kathryn

    Great Pottery Throwdown

    Where are you finding this, Brad?
  8. Kathryn

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    I love that little nudge. Just a gentle, polite reminder that the pup is there and would like something. If it's a matter or going out or of asking to be lifted onto the bed, however, both of ours resorts to the "bark." Oban is polite -- just one bark unless we ignore that. Angus speaks with a longer request. We take both Oban and Angus out at around 10:30 each night for one last pee. At 7 and 2, they seem to last through the night. (At 71 and 77, neither Steve nor I do, however.) Good dog, Ruffy. Good dog owner, Sanford!
  9. Hillscreek

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    Aw Ruffy you're the one.......and you too sanford for answering the call. Long lives to the two of you 🍷
  10. Dianne

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    Ah, yes the nudge and "the stare" Katie gives my husband Kirk "the nudge" if her dinner is delayed... She will give us the "Evil Eye Stare" when she want to go out... "she who must be obeyed!!!
  11. Sam I Am

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    The paw...dad dad quick. Love it. 💕🐾🐾
  12. bradl

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    The nudge is gold. Well done both of you. Nothing better than good communication (mutually) rewarded.
  13. Pepper Bug's Mom

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    I love the Cairn "nudge"!!!!
  14. sanford

    Good dog Lassie (Ruffy)!

    At 14 and a bit arthritic, Ruffy is not very demonstrative these days so I was impressed - and concerned- when he woke me at 4 AM, trying to jump up onto my bed and staring straight into my (sleepy) eyes with his nose practically touching mine, while repeatedly nudging my arm with his paw. Clearly, this was an emergency, so I instantly hopped out of bed and attempted to at least get partially dressed to get him out as fast as I could. Just like Lassie, when Timmy was in the well, Ruffy kept dashing back and forth between the bedroom and the front door, whirling in circles for emphasis. We made it out to the street and his urgent mission was immediately accomplished. Phew! I'm just so impressed (and grateful) for his ability to communicate, (right out of Central Casting)! Now that he's a senior, I find myself occaisionally remembering his young, rambunctious days when I thought he might never become civilized before I'd lost my mind... so I'm submitting this post as a tribute to, and an appreciation for all our cairns. Thanks Ruffy... Extra treats for you today!
  15. Rss Bot

    OCD in Dogs: Can it Happen?

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) in the dog world is also known as Canine Compulsive Disorder or CCD. It’s identified by normal dog behaviors that are performed in such an extreme, repetitive way that they are difficult for the dog to stop and can interfere with the dog’s ability to function. Examples of normal dog behaviors that in some dogs have become compulsive include sucking on their flanks or a toy; incessant licking, called acral lick dermatitis; pacing, spinning, and chasing the tail; freezing and staring; snapping at flies or invisible items; unabated and patterned barking; and excessive drinking of water or eating dirt. You may be thinking, “Oh, no! My dog does lots of these things.” Many dogs bark a lot, chase their tails, spin when they’re happy, and bite at flies. The key is that they do it in expected situations, stop after a short time, and are able to rest and eat normally. It’s not so much what they do, but the extent to which they do it and their ability to control when they start and stop. For example, there’s nothing abnormal about a dog who retrieves a ball over and over or spins when excited. But if a dog wants to chase and retrieve or spin for many hours each day to the exclusion of other behaviors, and just can’t seem to stop, it’s time to seek advice from your veterinarian. There is an ongoing debate about whether dogs are actually capable of obsessing or having their thoughts completely focused on a behavior like people can – hence the change in naming the disorder in dogs to CCD. However, the Merck Veterinary Manual says, “they (dogs) do perceive and experience concern; therefore, the term obsessive-compulsive has also been used to describe this disorder in dogs.” What Causes OCD in Dogs? Research into the causes of compulsive behaviors in dogs is ongoing, and one area being studied is the genetic link. According to Dr. Jerry Klein, AKC chief veterinary officer, although any breed may develop a compulsive disorder, certain breeds seem to be more susceptible to specific types of compulsive behaviors. The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, in conjunction with other medical universities, identified a chromosome that confers a high risk of susceptibility of compulsive disorder in breeds. Further research showed that the structural brain abnormalities of Doberman Pinschers afflicted with CCD are similar to those of humans with OCD. Merck reports that German Shepherd Dogs and Bull Terriers are known to spin or tail chase, while a genetic locus for flank sucking has been identified in Doberman Pinschers. Symptoms often start in young dogs. Dogs and people with OCD may have altered serotonin transmission, which affects the ability of brain cells and nervous system cells to communicate with each other. Human and canine medical researchers are studying the common pathways associated with OCD in both species with the hope of finding genetic tests that will allow for earlier intervention and better treatment for dogs and for people. In addition to the genetic cause, veterinarians and animal behaviorists believe that in some dogs, compulsive behaviors are extreme reactions resulting from a lack of physical and mental stimulation, high anxiety, the absence of a job to do, frustration, arousal, or from receiving insufficient attention. How to Treat OCD in Dogs One of the biggest problems we face when dogs display OCD behaviors is that they can’t tell us what they’re obsessing about. So it can be very hard to diagnose. Is your dog just energetic or is it something more? It’s not so much what they do, but the way that they do it. Diagnosis by a veterinarian and intervention is critical, as soon as possible. Compulsive behaviors can be destructive to dog, home, and relationships, and are often difficult to live with. And without treatment, they only get worse. Dr. Klein advises that another reason to see your vet is that there are some behaviors that may be due to an underlying medical condition. When you go to your vet, it will help if you have a good description of the behavior (video recordings are great), a record of when and how often the behaviors occur, whether any specific situation seems to set them off, and how old the dog was when they began to occur. Treatments that have been successful with some dogs include medication and behavior modification. “Research has shown that dogs with OCD have an altered serotonin level, so drugs that affect the absorption of serotonin can help reduce some behaviors. This needs to be partnered with teaching new behaviors that interrupt and redirect the compulsive behaviors, such as sitting when excited rather than spinning,“ says Dr. Klein. Consultation with an animal behaviorist can help you understand how to interrupt and teach new behaviors. In addition, the dog’s environment may need to be altered. A predictable routine can reduce anxiety; lots of physical and challenging mental exercise can diffuse pent-up energy. “When normal dog behaviors morph into time-consuming, overwhelming, endless repetitions, it doesn’t mean your dog is misbehaving,” says Dr. Klein. “You’ve reached a point where he needs to be examined, diagnosed, and helped before these behaviors affect the quality of life for you and your dog.” The post OCD in Dogs: Can it Happen? appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  16. Earlier
  17. Jeanean Martin

    Looking for a puppy

    Hello Everyone, I am not really part of this group but appreciate you letting me ask a question. We lost our dear "Molly" just a short while ago. We had her for over 11 years and she was really a part of our family. Would love to get another girl for my husband's birthday the end of this month. Any chance there might be one available? thank you, Jeanean Martin
  18. Pepper Bug's Mom

    Biting 5 Yr old cairn with any personal care

    I have fed all my dogs since puppies with my hand - now they can eat their food from bowls and no growling, etc. You might try the hand feeding for a while and see if that helps
  19. Pepper Bug's Mom

    Cairn so, so fat

    Pepper (9) and Brodie (3) only et 1/4 cup of food in the morning and 1/4 cup in the evening. Their treats are 1/4" carrot bits that I cut up and give on walks. They do get in the morning a peanut butter bit in their rubbery nylabones...So far they both are 15.5 lb but have vet checks next month so we will see. Pepper is still acitive and fast chasing a ball, hunting for vermin on walks, finding live rats in our rat traps, ect....Brodie has no interest in ball chasing or rats but will play with other dogs and is very friendly and no escape artist.
  20. Hillscreek

    Biting 5 Yr old cairn with any personal care

    Agree with pk and others. Get vet check. If she is healthy then the thing that worked best for me with Angus when he got riotous was time out. This was demanding and hard work for me. First because in the beginning bad behavior often happened again soon after he was released. I had to start over many many times. Second I did not want to use his crate for punishment. We travelled quite a bit and his crate was his safe place. I found a spot where he could be safe and out of sight. I left him alone a short time after he quieted down. At times I had him on harness and leash where I could step on the leash and hold him by one hand on harness and the other arm round his body and under his chest - struggling and carrying on of course. Message was you can be with us if you learn to restrain yourself - hard for a cairn or any terrier to agree to. But eventually he did learn. Most cairns are very sociable and hate to be left out of what's happening. Also as several others mention do not get mad at her. She'll get mad right back. A canine behaviorist might help by observing you and your dog's interactions. Can't say much about grooming. I didn't do much. He went to his groomer regularly. He loved her.
  21. Hillscreek

    Cairn so, so fat

    Agree a visit to the vet needed especially since you cite how taught her stomach is. She might not just be fat she might have a medical problem. Suggest no treats. I know it is almost impossible not to share a little.😄 As a general rule I have done like Brad - give less if dog getting fat give more if dog losing weight. And different dogs need different amounts as he says.
  22. pkcrossley

    Biting 5 Yr old cairn with any personal care

    that's true, they are big escalators. with time out, there is nothing to escalate. look sorry, you get out on probation. more nonsense, away you go. they learn the game fast if you are consistent and fair.
  23. I also tried to flip Ruffy on his side as per advice I was given and found that it only escalated the situation. As PK says, Isolating and ignoring usually have an effect, but it’s not easy to be more persistent and stubborn than they are!
  24. A team of psychologists have discovered a new way for humans to bond with cats. View the source article
  25. pkcrossley

    Biting 5 Yr old cairn with any personal care

    cairns will fight fiercely to resist anything they don't like, but my impression is that once they are convinced they are wasting their time, they stop. your dog sounds unusual. the Jekyll/hyde thing makes me think something medical --vision problems? hearing problems? back problems? I'm still sticking to the advice about a strong harness and a short leash kept on in the house. if you can get it on once, its on. use it to put her in time out when there is a problem. but she also needs a thorough physical check. she's a good girl, sounds like she needs help over this hump. if she checks out medically, the next thing is to check everybody in your household --is anybody giving her the idea she can get her way? are you backing off when she gets snarly? are you inconsistent in what you permit or forbid? all these create big problems in dealing with a cairn.
  26. Kathryn

    First Nap

    After the cone came off
  27. I have tried gloves but fireplace gloves don't give you enough dexterity. I was also told to flip her on her side which is impossible. For a little dog she is very strong. I have tried a muzzle and harness and can't get either one over her face w/o getting bit. She is food aggressive and has also been attacked by bigger dogs at dig Park so now she hates big black dogs even friendly ones that just want to play. She started out as a sweet puppy but now around 75% can be an overly stressed mess. She can also be an adorable sweet thing, she is like jekyll and hyde. Anne
  28. Sam I Am

    Dangerous pigs ears

    For those of you that give your dogs pigs ears hear in Canada please read. Not sure if these brands are sold in other countries. https://www.dogfoodadvisor.com/dog-food-recall/salmonella-outbreak-pig-ears/
  29. pkcrossley

    Cairn so, so fat

    what Brad said. if the abdomen feels hard, no give, your dog could be suffering from bloat and be in big trouble.
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