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Autumn & Lola

What is the purpose of stripping?

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Autumn & Lola

I've had Molly for 6 weeks now. She is 13 months old. When I got her from the local Humane Society, she looked very "shaggy". I called the groomer a couple weeks later and told her that I would like Molly hand-stripped. The groomer said, "Is she a show dog?" I said no, a pet. The groomer said, "Well, I won't do stripping anyway, and you don't need to have that done if she is a pet. It is very, very painful for the dog. There is no need to put her through that!" The groomer seemed adamant about the pain part, and I said, "Oh, I had no idea. I read on the Internet that it was painless." The groomer likened the process to using an Epilady on one's legs - that contraption that pulls the hair out by the roots all at one time. So of course I said I didn't want that done to Molly, and I booked an appointment to have her hair trimmed.

Since then I joined this forum and have seen many posts about stripping, and that people do it themselves at home. In reading them, it seems to me that stripping is no more painful than when we humans comb our hair and lots of hair comes out on the comb or brush, but it doesn't hurt us to come out, as it is loose.

So which is correct? Painful or not?

and.......... what is the purpose of stripping the coat?

Lastly..........did I ruin Molly's coat by having her clipped??

Thanks for any info!

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kintra

The purpose of handstripping is to give a Cairn's coat the proper texture (a hard, wirey feel). When Cairns were originated as working dogs, they needed the harsh coat to protect them from things that could scratch their skin (rocks, burrs, etc.). When a coat is harsh like that, it also serves protection against water...ie, it will shield the dog from some water and all around protection from the weather.

A lot of pet groomers won't do handstripping because it is such a precise art, and if done incorrectly, will not give the right results. I know of several pets who are handstripped because the owners want their dogs to hvae correct coat texture (heck...my retired show dog is still handstripped even though he doesn't show anymore).

Essentially, I think of it as you are shedding for the dog, if that makes sense. Since Cairns are typically labeled as a low-shedding dog, where does that hair go? It simply just keeps growing until some one, or something pulls it out.

Stripping is not painful if the hair is dead (the long, wispy, soft stuff). At 13 months old and after being clipped, you'd probably have to bring Molly to somebody to see if the coat could possibly still be handstripped. I'd suggest looking at the CTCA's breeder list...you can find somebody in your area and they are usually more than happy to discuss options with you and perhaps even groom the dog.

Good Luck!

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jimnconnie

You don't "need "to have Molly stripped, and you don't "need "to buy her a quality (not grocery store) brand food, and you don't "need "to make sure she is always secured behind a fence or with a leash, but if you want to do what is BEST for her you will do all of those things. Just because a dog isn't being shown, or isn't "show-quality" doesn't mean it doesn't deserve the best care you can give it. Most groomers, not all of course, can't be bothered with hand-stripping because it is too time consuming, and costs more than most customers would be willing to pay. The statements that groomer made show that she knows little, if anything, about hand-stripping Cairns. When the hair is dead, and ready to be removed, and if it is done properly, there is no pain involved, and in fact, many dogs enjoy grooming sessions. I encourage you to check around until you find someone who in knowledgeable about grooming Cairns. This information on Cairn Terrier Grooming will give you some insight into the reasons for stripping. Good Luck.

Jim

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Nena

I hand strip (and it does not hurt my dog) she may fuss sometimes but I am not hurting her. If you don't pull out the dead hair then your dog will start to smell because oil and dirt build up. A fresh stripping will keep your dog from having skin problems and they don't need a bath as often. I bath mine about once a month or longer. I strip a section at a time so as not prolong the stripping. Once you start doing it (and there are so many sights to show you how) it is really no problem and your dog will look so much better.

Don't trim the hair that does not get the dead hair out. I do trim around her eyes and rear when necessary.

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Autumn & Lola

Thank you all for your replies and for the link. I've learned a lot! I'm mad now that I let that groomer talk me into having her clipped. At least I found out before I brought her back again (which I will not be doing of course!)

Thanks all!

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kintra

I'd still recommend you have somebody who has been stripping coats for years look at her before you try stripping. If not stripped from the time they were young, the hair cuticles may have closed up somewhat, making it a lot harder/somewhat painful. I've heard of some coats being salvagable after being clipped, but it's not always the case.

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Autumn & Lola

Thanks Kintra. I am searching this site for the CTCA's breeder list but haven't found it yet. I do want to find someone in my area that really knows what they are doing so I will continue to look.

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bradl

www.cairnterrier.org/breeders

I think the #1 purpose of stripping is skin health.

#2 is probably convenience - a nice harsh coat repels dirt and water and smells good.

#3 is that thick, harsh coat is very much part of what makes a Cairn a Cairn and not some other type of dog.

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karwask

Hi All,

I'm new to this forum having just adopted a 12 year old rescue Cairn: Jack!

I did read the information about the need for hand stripping but noted the suggestion that large.20171110_092812.jpg.7a7b64430fca235261ffa90df6d29d99.jpgone can also do a partial measure with details on how to do "regular brushing" most effectively from the Crofter's Dream site. 

So, first off, is anyone doing this and how is it working out?

Second: how often are you doing the "regular brushing" suggested in the Crofter's Dream information? 

Lastly: Any suggestions/insights about the various tools: combs and brushes and such that you use or have used? I have never had to groom a dog before (former guinea pig owner and black labs) so not entirely sure about what brushes and combs are being suggested.

thanks

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bradl

Welcome!

Regarding tools: I think you can do essentially all you need with three items: a metal comb, a pin brush, and a slicker.

I use a metal "greyhound" comb very much like this one (happens to be amazon but you can pick one up many places). I use the coarse end primarily. The size is up to your comfort. I mostly use a small one because it fits in my pocket and is light and maneuverable. Sometimes I find a big one easier to deal with (arthritis) even though it's heavier, especially for short periods.

 

For brushing we use a nice 20mm Chris Christensen one from show days

but as a practical matter you can use a cheapie pin brush from the drugstore. Advantages to a nice one are the tips are polished and smooth for the dog's skin and they last; a cheapie from the drug store will still do the job until they fall apart. For showing I used to use a deluxe (and expensive) Mason Pearson pocket brush but since we don't have any dogs in the ring at the moment I cleaned it up and now use it as my daily brush :P 

We also find a slicker brush invaluable for raking out undercoat. Again with the amazon example but you can also get these at Petco alongside the metal combs and pin brushes. 

Many folks (myself included) occasionally use a Mars Coat King (or equivalent) to yank and cut some hair when taming a wild overgrown coat. MCK is sort of a topic all it's own, so I'll just leave a link to many previous topics on that: mars coat king: site:cairntalk.net

 

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Geo Sch

Hand stripping is also healthier for the skin. With brushing and hand stripping you shouldn’t have to bath a cairn. Clipped cairns collect dirt on the softer hair that is left after clipping. Do you want a dirty, smelly cairn?

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Flatpick

Our dog Piper gets a brushing (pin brush) every 3 or 4 days.  I use a Furminator rake (?) once a month.  She has had 2 baths in 2.5 years.  We trim her ears and feet once every 2 months.  She get lots of outside play time, rides on a SUP (Stand Up Paddleboard) thru the summer (swims) and has a very healthy, odor- free coat that is a combo of course wiry hair and soft undercoat. Not understanding what more we would get by handstripping?

 

steve

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Geo Sch

Are you clipping her or just brushing. If just brushing and you are maintaining the coarse hair and color, my guess is you are removing the dead or blown hair with the brushing. Stripping is a process to remove dead hair. If you are clipping, they tend to get lighter and softer, because you clip the coarse hair. By the way the CTCA has an excellent pamphlet on grooming a cairn terrier. It’s well worth it.

Edited by Geo Sch

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Flatpick

I just brush, no clipping.  seems like alot of dead hair comes out each brushing. maybe a small handful each time.

 

steve

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Toto-lee Cairn
On ‎12‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 3:43 PM, bradl said:

Welcome!

Regarding tools: I think you can do essentially all you need with three items: a metal comb, a pin brush, and a slicker.

I use a metal "greyhound" comb very much like this one (happens to be amazon but you can pick one up many places). I use the coarse end primarily. The size is up to your comfort. I mostly use a small one because it fits in my pocket and is light and maneuverable. Sometimes I find a big one easier to deal with (arthritis) even though it's heavier, especially for short periods.

 

For brushing we use a nice 20mm Chris Christensen one from show days

but as a practical matter you can use a cheapie pin brush from the drugstore. Advantages to a nice one are the tips are polished and smooth for the dog's skin and they last; a cheapie from the drug store will still do the job until they fall apart. For showing I used to use a deluxe (and expensive) Mason Pearson pocket brush but since we don't have any dogs in the ring at the moment I cleaned it up and now use it as my daily brush :P 

We also find a slicker brush invaluable for raking out undercoat. Again with the amazon example but you can also get these at Petco alongside the metal combs and pin brushes. 

Many folks (myself included) occasionally use a Mars Coat King (or equivalent) to yank and cut some hair when taming a wild overgrown coat. MCK is sort of a topic all it's own, so I'll just leave a link to many previous topics on that: mars coat king: site:cairntalk.net

 

Thanks for the links.  Each of the (3) tools is still available, Brad. I have ordered them to supplement what I have. I am determined -- maybe as stubborn as my 'Toto'? -- to do this grooming thing. I can attest to how much better a Cairn's coat is, if not clipped.  Unfortunately, my first Cairn, a rescue, had always been clipped, and his coat was nothing like my puppy's.  He had skin issues I had to address, and he would sometimes smell just 'funky.'  None of that has been my experience this time around.

Unfortunately, my little stinker has had to have (2) baths in the past few months:  he got so muddy, playing with a neighbor's dog, until I thought brushing him would never get him clean, and his second bath was to get a smell of vomit off him after we had to get him to regurgitate a small shoe-liner-style-sock -- but that's a whole nuther, scary story!

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Guest dog person

I use a variety of brushes, combs, rake, furminator, Mars.

But, I do a quick brushing at least once a day if even for only 5 minutes.   I pull out about a handful of hair.

I have noticed that if I skip a day or two, he gets itchy.    He will roll around on his back on the sidewalk when we are out on walks.

* ALERT:   Please note, if you have the standard type leash clasp, they can easily get it undone while rolling around on their backs and run free!   I am speaking from experience.

At least get the lobster style clasp.   These terriers cannot be trusted.

YES  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Handcraft-Heavy-Duty-Genuine-Leather-Pet-Dog-Leash-Leads-Brass-Clasp-Black-Brown/263255663523?hash=item3d4b42a3a3:rk:5:pf:0&var

NO https://www.ebay.com/itm/Handcraft-Heavy-Duty-Genuine-Leather-Pet-Dog-Leash-Leads-Brass-Clasp-Black-Brown/263255663523?hash=item3d4b42a3a3:rk:5:pf:0&var

I am not familiar with these products, just want to show the difference between clasp styles.

Even better  https://www.amazon.com/Ruffwear-Knot-Leash-Reflective-Carabiner/dp/B00R1UZLBA?ref_=bl_dp_s_web_17883710011

Edited by dog person

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Guest dog person

Oops!     I meant to say avoid the standard type clasp, my second link in prior post is incorrect.

 

Edited by dog person

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arevcindy

I had two groomers tell me that stripping is painful for the Dog and one of them flat out told me it was cruel :( . I know now that they just did not want to do it. I did find someone two towns over who is willing, but honestly, I have no idea if she really knows what she is doing. She does not regularly strip. I took Archie to her and bath, trim, nail clipping and partial strip was done in 45 min? Did not seem right to me and was expensive. Archie also seemed quite freaked out afterwards. After some research I decided to try a "mars coat king" deshedding tool. It cost less than one stripping so was worth a try. I love it! Carefully combed a ton of hair out of Archie and he did not mind it. I will probably take him in for light trimming etc and just use the coat king here at home. I am so glad I did not cave in and have him clipped when all the naysayers were convincing me there was no other way. Thinking of getting a smaller size CK for legs, face, tail.  

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Sam I Am

If not showing Mars comb works great ..I also use thinning shears. Sam is not happy when having his coat stripped

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Pepper Bug's Mom

I use the Mars comb and scissors and Pepper and Brodie hate getting groomed - especially the tummy area....

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