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Topbitch

Kicked out of doggie daycare!

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Topbitch

Hello. I am new but in need of Cairn advice. My 2 year old Rory has always gone ballistic when someone walks by the house, particularly if they have a dog with them. We take him for walks and try to socialize him but he still yelps to high heaven with that piercing screech. I took him to doggie daycare yesterday, with the sweetest most patient and experienced sitter, and she said he couldn't come back until he changes. Apparently he just got in the face of every other dog and barked non-stop at them until she separated them because she was afraid he would get hurt. Obviously we cannot go to obedience classes for awhile so I am wondering if anyone has advice. I have tried positive and negative reinforcement consistently, but I am wasting my time. Oh, he is also on Prozac which doesn't work.

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sanford

All I can tell you is that Ruffy, now 12, did the exact same thing when I first got him at 3 yrs. old. We were actually invited to join a play group and then, asked to leave! His was the only voice you would hear -  loudly, incessantly barking, but only at the big dogs - ignoring those his size or smaller. After aprox 2-4 years his barking totally stopped. I never found a remedy. All I can recommend is - earplugs!😀

Good luck!

 

 

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pkcrossley

2 years old is the most difficult age for cairns. my view is all young cairns have to go boot camp. learn commands, perform them (in order to get results --don't use treats, that is them training you, not the other way around. if being good gets a cairn what he wants in terms of attention, exercise, affection, etc, that should be good enough). sit before meals. sit when a dog or stranger approaches. when my cairn barked when I was getting his dinner, I would freeze like a statue. he eventually learned that barking is only a needless interruption of things he wants to happen. fortunately he continued to bark at things he found truly alarming, like unexpected visitors. it takes time. you are at the peak problem time. 

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Hillscreek

Sympathy but alas no real advice re barking at other dogs. I lucked out because Angus was given a lesson by an older jrt he'd known since  he was a small pup. Fed up with annoying 18 month old who wouldn't take the hint of lifted lip, lifted lip and small growl, she gave big growl and pounced. He submitted at once rolling onto his back exposing his underside. She sniffed him up and down before backing off letting him get up. He was so apologetic to her! Behaved properly with dogs thereafter.

I think Rory like Ruffy will learn dog manners as he matures.

Barking other other circumstances remained the same for Angus. One has to remember that cairns were born to bark and it is virtually impossible to stop all barking. Their job was to enter dens and bark when they found prey there to alert their masters. It's still their job to alert us when squirrel runs up a tree or UPS guy delivers a package.

You can work on good behavior at home as pk suggests.

 

 

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