Jump to content
Sam I Am

Cats and poop

Recommended Posts

Sam I Am

I like cats and for that matter pretty much all animals, however there is a cat that has decided that a corner of our yard is an ideal area for potty!  It’s never been a problem as most cats are wise to the fact that two terriers live on the property. But for the last couple of weeks a new cat or feral cat during the night  has been depositing their poop as the ground isn’t frozen yet. Sam who is not a poop eater has discovered that cat poop is very tasty 🤮. So to try to stop the cat from using our corner of the yard for its personal bathroom I have put down plastic fencing which I hope will stop this feline from digging ...if not will have to get a live  trap and bring  the cat to the bylaw station.  Has anyone got other ideas on keeping these critters from soiling in our yard? I don’t fancy bringing  in a fecal sample every month to the vet to make sure our dogs don’t have parasites!

Edited by Sam I Am

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pkcrossley

cats can wander around Alberta this time of year and do their stuff outside?  tough cats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sanford
14 minutes ago, pkcrossley said:

cats can wander around Alberta this time of year and do their stuff outside?  tough cats.

:shock:!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sam I Am

Yes we are actually in a just below freezing temp at the moment and climbing up above freezing in the next couple of days. . Climate in Alberta can be totally unpredictable . Changing within 24 hrs to bone chilling cold, dropping 30 degrees.

Unfortunately we have feral cats that suffer terribly, losing ears, tails being  frozen off. I have managed to fence off part of the yard where the cat does potty and will live trap it in the spring and will hand it over to the humane society. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ripper70

Would it be possible to train Sam to not eat the poop? I've seen YouTube vids on several methods to accomplish this.

A variety of devices could be used to repel cats as suggested here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sam I Am

Sam is not a poop eater except him and Rosie have discovered that cat poopcicles are tasty as do many many dogs, due to the high meat content in a lot of cat foods. It’s gross to us humans but totally ok with almost 100% of dogs. People that have cats and dogs cohabiting will tell you that the kitty litter box has to be out of reach of their canine companions.I just have to get rid of the cat by trapping ...unfortunately many cat owners are negligent owners and seem to think it’s fine to let them loose. It’s not the cats fault but the owners.

Thanks for the varies ways to rid your yard of cats hints. Will read and see. Of course it can’t be toxic to both my dogs . In the summer it’s no problem as the hose on jet makes them stay away. Although I did one year have a feral male cat (he was huge) that sat on the fence mere feet away from me hiss and scream at me as I was hosing it down...scared the heck out of me. The two terriers came bounding up and at that point the cat decided that being attacked by these two was not a good option to a long life. I have never seen him again...thank goodness!

Edited by Sam I Am

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register after. If you already have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


CairnTalk.net

A meeting place and online scrapbook for Cairn Terrier fanciers.

Disclaimers

All posts are the opinion and responsibility of the poster.

Post content © the author.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Site Guidelines | We put cookies on your device to help this website work better for you. You can adjust your cookie settings; otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.