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LindaMC

Bladder Stones

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LindaMC

It turns out, after thinking that Maisie was all better, that she has bladder stones and a lot of them.  They're not sure what type of stones they are so we are going to put her on a special diet, along with more antibiotics, to see if they will dissolve.  If not, then she'll have to have surgery...:(  I am beside myself with worry for her, not to mention the huge vet bill I'm going to have for surgery, if that's they way we have to go.  The vet quoted me a price of $1,600 to $1,800, does that sound about right?  I wouldn't mind but my car is going in the shop later today and I may be seeing a large bill for that too.  Not easy on somebody who is on a fixed income.  Always something.

Maisie is such a picky eater, I'm hoping that she'll eat this food...:(

 

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Hillscreek

Oh I know what you mean when funds are limited. It's been like that for me. Angus's dentistry work and work on my Jeep both together - not good. Poor Maisie and poor you. Let's hope the stones will dissolve and the antibiotics will help. I know nothing about bladder stones. How did they form in Maisie?

 

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LindaMC

Not sure how they formed, there are a few different types of stones, the two most common are

1: Sturvite - Struvites contain magnesium, ammonium, and phosphate. They almost always occur in the bladder in combination with a bacterial infection and are most frequently found in small-breed females.  Unfortunately, Cairn Terriers are on the list of dogs more likely to get bladder stones.

2: Calcium Oxalate Stones - CaOx stones occur in both the bladder (lower urinary tract) and kidneys (upper urinary tract) of male and female dogs. Most calcium oxalate uroliths are nephroliths (found in the kidney), and most of the affected patients are small-breed males. CaOx uroliths are radiopaque and most are easily seen on radiographs (X-rays).

Twenty-five years ago, struvites were the most common uroliths collected from canine patients, representing almost 80 percent of the total, while only 5 percent were calcium oxalate stones. The percentage of struvite uroliths found has declined while that of CaOx stones has risen, so that nearly half of all canine uroliths analyzed today are calcium oxalate stones. It’s unknown whether the incidence of struvite stones has decreased or if the change is due solely to an increase in calcium oxalate uroliths.

I'm more concerned about her having the CaOx stones which I believe are not treatable by diet and therefore require surgery.  What I'm going to try to do is  see if I can catch some of these stones when she urinate so they can know for sure what we're dealing with.  Right now she is straining and not producing any urine and will go this way up to 5-6 times and then suddenly urinate quite a bit.  Hopefully once she is on this food for a few days, she'll urinate more and make it easier to catch some.

I gave her a little of the food when I picked her up and brought her home from the vets and she gobbled it up, so hopefully she'll keep eating it.  It's expensive and I may have to feed it to her for the rest of her life....:cry:    No treats either which is going to really upset her, she loves her treats.  Whatever it takes to  get her better is all that matters.  I had to drop her off this morning at the vets so they could squeeze her in for some xrays and I missed her like crazy.

 

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Rylee's mama

I hope she gets better. I know what it's like to have to fork out a LOT of money all at once. I have had to do it with Rylee multiple times. You're not alone though because I am having problems with Rylee's stomach and his anal glands.:thumbsdown:

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Corn Niblet

I don't have experience with a dog having this bladder surgery, but two years ago  my 12 year old cat had stones removed by surgery for around  $1,000. Recovery after surgery took a long time and we were very worried but he did pull through and did fine.

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remltr

Substitute her treats with her new food. That way she still gets a treat and it is obviously something she likes.

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sanford
9 hours ago, LindaMC said:

The vet quoted me a price of $1,600 to $1,800. Not easy on somebody who is on a fixed income.

For vet care here in NYC I've taken Ruffy to the Humane Society of NY, where prices are approx 1/2 - 2/3 of what private vets charge. I know you are in Mass., but I don't know how close you are to Boston. I looked up Humane Society in Boston (and in Mass. as well), online and there are a number of sources for low cost veterinary care:

Angell Animal Med Ctr. (Non-Profit)

Fairy Dog Parents (Non-Profit), assistance with medical needs

Sampson Fund Cape Cod, financial assistance for caregivers who cannot afford treatment.

Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, North Grafton Mass. Low cost care for family pets at Cummings Veterinary Medical Center in Central Mass.

I hope this helps. Good luck!

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LindaMC

Thank you sanford, this does help and was discussing this earlier with my husband.  We aren't too far from Tufts in North Grafton and if we have to go the route of surgery, I will most definitely be calling them.  I wouldn't mind driving in to Boston either, it's about an hour and a half ride from where I'm located.

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Hillscreek

And don't forget about Care Credit - a financing option our vet uses for patients who have high cost of treatment.

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LindaMC
Posted (edited)

I have Care Credit but unfortunately my limit is only $1,500 and due to doctor's visits, shots, Xray and food, is considerably lower.  I am going to stay positive and pray that the food and antibiotics will work.  I don't like the fact of her having to be on antibiotics for 30  days but there's not much else I can do about it.  

I just received the estimate on my car and it's not too bad, I thought it was going to be a lot more, so that's a huge relief and now I can concentrate on putting funds together for surgery, if that's the was we'll have to go.

Thanks to everyone for your support and help, I appreciate it very much.

Edited by LindaMC

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hheldorfer

The best of luck to you Linda.  We'll be thinking of you and praying for a good outcome for Maisie.

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Dempsy's Mom

Same here.  Good luck to you and Maisie.  :wub:

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kieiras mom

Keira  has bladder stones also.Whst prescription food is Masie on?

 

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LindaMC

 

On 5/15/2017 at 7:51 PM, kieiras mom said:

Keira  has bladder stones also.Whst prescription food is Masie on?

 

Maisie is on Hill's Prescription Urinary Tract S/D and she is also getting antibiotics along with it.   It's nasty looking food, reminds me of Play Dough, with no nutritional value but it seems to be working.  She hasn't had any accidents in the house, she's not straining anymore either.  I'm not sure how to tell if it getting rid of the stones.  She goes back for another x-ray on June 5th; so I'll know then whether or not she'll have to have surgery.  I'm praying that they'll be gone.  She'll most likely have to be on a special diet for the rest of her life.  It breaks my heart, she can't have anything else but this food and she cries for her treats all the time....:(

What prescription food is Keira on?  How is she doing on it?

 

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pkcrossley

seems like at any given time half to 2/3 of my pets are on prescription diets. they are not particularly nutritious, it is true, and some of them don't look very appetizing. but i can say they work. no pet that i've had who has gone on a prescription diet has continued to have problems with stones, colon irritation, stomach problems, or whatever. in fact they have been healthy for the rest of their lives (in relation to the problem that invoked the diet in the first place). pets i had to take to the vet every six weeks, with mounting bills, straightened out on these diets. most of them cause pets to drink a lot more than they would otherwise, which is the basic intervention that makes them much healthier; second major factor is keeping grains, fillers and other irritants out of the dog's diet. the prescription diets also come off special production lines, so some companies whose general line i would never consider feeding my pets (since they don't need melamine and so on in their food) i give the prescription diets knowing they are as safe as you can get with pet food.

you can probably ask the vet whether it is okay to supplement the food with better sources of nutrition --vegetables (for dogs), fish oil, nutrition pastes, peanut butter, boiled chicken or beef. depending on what the problem is, some will be okay and some will not. and it is also the case that if you can use the strict diet to get the pet stabilized, after a year or so you can introduce a bit of variety without knocking the pet off track (since the medicated diet will keep them drinking).

i also wonder whether there are not diet-consistent treats that these dogs can have. if your vet is good on nutrition (most are not, alas), he or she might suggest some treats, but there is also good research on the internet. you have to select things that are suitable to the dog's particular problem, but there should be something. the point is: once you get maisie on track (which could mean a certain period of the straight and narrow), she can probably have some variety again. she will have treats some day.

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kieiras mom

thanks pk . I needed conformation from some on that had the problem

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kieiras mom

Am sorry, you  are dealing with a computer idiot with me. I   put Keiras food in another container so I can seal it and will let you know when I buy more food. She is doing well. Just one accident in the last month.

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kieiras mom

Keira is on the same diet as Maise. Thanks for all the help here.

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