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  1. Today
  2. pkcrossley

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    hear hear
  3. Yesterday
  4. sanford

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    Years ago, I adopted Carrington when he was at the (advanced) age of 10. He lived to almost 17, in good health until his last year. I never felt I had an "old" dog. He always kept me on my toes... and on the run. Somehow the word "senior" never seemed to apply to him. I've told his story here before: His original owner died and her adult sons did not want him and kept him isolated and confined to an enclosed porch until they decided to have the vet euthanize him. The vet took Carrington and contacted Col. Potter Cairn Rescue, which is how I came to find him. It's not overstating it to say that Carrington changed my life. We became joined at the hip as he went everywhere with me. He was my first-ever dog and taught me everything there was to know about the breed. He happened to be an excellent example of "Cairn", both physically and temperamentally and it's thanks to what I learned from this "old" dog that I was later up to the challenge of taking on 3-year old Ruffy, who became joined to my other hip! On the shelf of my dog books is one titled "Old Dogs Are the Best Dogs."... (I knew that)!
  5. CamilleatGaelforce

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    Thank you, pkcrossley and Hillscreek. Charlie is a charming little scamp, which is good because he is certainly not perfect. He does mark in the house, and he's started a fight with his toothless older brother, which I had to break up, and then he went for me, but he was certainly shocked to find out I was not an easy mark, not with 35+ years of Scottie ownership and more than a decade of rescue fostering the same under my belt. I do think he'd be happier as the only boy dog in a house, or maybe even as an only dog, but I'm FOR SURE not going to take him back to the shelter, he'll just have to accept that he has to live by the rules, which include no picking on the toothless one, and "if you pee on a dog bed, out it goes, and eventually you sleep on the cold, hard floor". I am sure Colonel Potter Rescue could find him a better home, but I hope I don't have to ask them to, I do love the little brat-boy.
  6. Hillscreek

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    People taking care of older needy cairns and others, like you are doing are to be praised. Thank you for being one of them.
  7. pkcrossley

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    these stories of older, unfortunate dogs finding love, understanding and support give me such hope for humanity. thank you somuch for taking good care of this handsome, deserving guy.
  8. Last week
  9. CamilleatGaelforce

    New hello from an old terrier owner

    Just wanted to give everyone a quick update on Charlemagne Da Dog, aka Charles Barkley, aka Charlie Gnarly Marley Barley Cairn, aka Speed Bump. He's presented me with several challenges since he came home in February, that's for sure! First he started gaining weight rapidly, and heat-seeking, so off to the vet, sure enough, he's hypothyroid. The extra weight on his joints began making him incapable of walking more than a few steps without limping, and the vet could tell those shoulders and front legs were painful, so daily Galliprant it is, sparing his liver while relieving his pain. Then, a couple of months later, he started having lots of gut cramping with loose stool, so we tested for everything, nothing showed up re: parasites, infections or infestations, but the smell gave me a hint, so we started pancreatic enzymes, and sure enough, the problems cleared up, so he's got Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency. Thankfully there are now pancreatic enzyme supplements that are more reasonably priced than Viokase V, the supplement I had to use on one of the Rescue Scotties I fostered years ago, so keeping him healthy won't bankrupt me. Poor old guy, he's been burdened with more health problems than I could have imagined, but he's worth it. Damnable puppy mills!
  10. CamilleatGaelforce

    Ruffy died today...

    Sanford, I am so sorry for your loss, I wish I had logged in sooner to see your post and respond in a more timely fashion!
  11. CamilleatGaelforce

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    MurphySings, I am so terribly, terribly sorry you got such horrible news! I don't have experience with this cancer in a Cairn, but I lost a 7 year old Scottie girl to it, three days after her birthday, back in 2002. Her tumor was on her aorta, and we did not know it was there, she gave us no signs until it ruptured one morning, and she went from bouncing around for her breakfast to refusing to eat it a moment later. Her gums were gray, we rushed to the vet. They didn't know what was going on, they thought she must have been vomiting to be so dehydrated, and mentioned poisoning, so they sent me home to look for vomit piles while they rehydrated her with IV fluids. Just as I walked in the door the phone rang, saying she had keeled over in her kennel, did I want them to do CPR. I said "YES!, she's only 7 years old!", but it was already too late, her aorta, which had clotted off from it's original rupture, opened back up with extra fluids, which increased her blood pressure and thinned her blood, displacing the clot, and she bled to death into her chest. I wasn't even with her when she died, her last memory of me was of me leaving her behind at the vet's office! It breaks my heart to this day. I took her sister and her son and daughter with me when I went back to the vet's office, so they could see that she was gone. Her sister never recovered fully from that loss, they had been partners in crime their whole lives, I called them Beaver Girls because they chewed up so much furniture. Since you know what is coming, keep an eye out for a sudden loss of energy, or even a collapse, that will mean the tumor has ruptured and Murphy is bleeding internally. He may pass swiftly that way, without the vet's euthanasia solution, or he may just be so weak you know it's time, and the vet will end Murphy's suffering. You and your Murphy will be in my prayers for as much good time together as possible before you must part ways for a while.
  12. kjwarnold

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    We lost our Packy at age 12 just about 5 years ago to Hemangiosarcoma. Like you, we elected not to pursue aggressive treatment because it wouldn’t extend his life much and would most likely make him feel bad. One of the best pieces of advice I got at the time was to “let him be the dog he wants to be” since he didn’t know he was sick. We treated him like always and while he gradually declined, he had enough Cairn spirit left to chase one of our peacocks across the yard. He trotted back, obviously proud of himself. That was 2 days before we lost him. My thoughts are with you; it’s tough but you’ll get through it. And now we have Phinney, who I swear is Packy reincarnated. It’s like Packy sent him to us with an “owner’s manual” on us!
  13. calypso

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    This is a tough diagnosis to hear. We lost our dear 15 year old Bella to lymphoma, and like a lot of folks here, understand how you feel. Our beloved Cairns never live long enough, and it’s hard to say goodbye. At the same time, now that the initial loss is a couple of years behind us, I mostly feel huge gratitude for the fifteen years we did have.
  14. Hillscreek

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    No experience with this cancer but like many have had experience of knowing the future is limited with my dog. If there is one good thing as others have said. Murphy doesn't know. Enjoy each remaining moment with him. He will leave you in one way but he will leave your heart.
  15. MurphySings

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    Thank you all so much for responding. The sun is shining and we have a nice breeze on the ridge today. Murphy is behaving as if he hasn’t a care in the world. All Is well for now and we so gratefully accept that.
  16. pkcrossley

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    i understand this situation so well (not with hemangiosarcoma but with pituitary macroadenoma, though at a much younger age than Murphy). every day will be golden for you now, and Murphy knows that you are at his side every step of the way. dogs are very courageous in their pursuit of survival and Murphy will treasure every single day, exactly as if he were going to live 30 more years. i know you will make his happiness the first priority --he is certainly going to make yours his. i am so sorry you are going through this. Murphy will always be with you. you won't believe it at first, but he will be.
  17. bradl

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    I am very sad to hear of Murphy's hemangiosarcoma. I have no experience of it specifically, but the experience of impending loss of an old dog is one I (and many others) can relate to. Enjoy this time with him as bittersweet as it is. It is a privilege to love and care for an old Cairn.
  18. Rss Bot

    6 Tips for Giving Your Dog Pills

    A spoonful of sugar might help our medicine go down, but dogs typically pose a bit more of a challenge. While some canine companions dutifully eat their pills with dinner, most tend to need a little encouragement. These tips for giving your dog a pill will make the process more pleasant for everyone involved. Pill Pockets Not all medication can be given with food. But if it can, putting the pill in a pill pocket or wrapping it in a piece of cheese makes it easy to slip into your dog’s system. Keep in mind that this approach works best for dogs that wolf down treats without chewing. Dogs that chew soft treats may bite into the unpleasant-tasting medicine, making them harder to trick next time. It should be noted that dogs with food sensitivities or allergies might have issues with the ingredients in pill pockets, so consult your veterinarian if your canine companion has had problems with food in the past. Compounded and Liquid Medications Sometimes you can opt for a flavored compounded medication or a chewable “treat” tablet. This works well for dogs that don’t like to swallow their pills. However, these medications can be more expensive — depending on the drug — and your veterinarian may caution against compounding certain drugs because it could impact their effectiveness. Also, medications are not always compounded at every pharmacy. Ask your veterinarian to guide you to pharmacies that are noted for compounding medications. Pill Device Administering pills to your dog can pose certain risks. For instance, in order to get the pill far enough back on your dog’s tongue for him to swallow, you need to put your fingers in his mouth. This can lead to accidental bites. Pill devices place the medication in your dog’s mouth, so that you don’t have to expose your fingers to danger. A dog’s tongue has a hump, and in order to succeed in getting him to swallow the pill, you need to place it behind the hump. Once you’ve done that, close his jaws and gently stroke his throat in a downward motion to encourage him to swallow the pill. Get Help Restraining a dog while also trying to give him medication is difficult. If possible, ask a friend or family member to hold your dog for you, so that you can concentrate fully on the task at hand. Reward Your Dog The last thing you want is to make this process stressful. Reward your dog with a small treat after every pill, and do your best to keep both of you calm, no matter how frustrated you get. Ask Your Veterinarian for a Demonstration Successful administration of pills is an art form. When in doubt, request a demonstration on proper technique from your veterinarian. The post 6 Tips for Giving Your Dog Pills appeared first on American Kennel Club. View the source article
  19. Sam I Am

    Housebreaking in a highrise

    Pretty sure if I ran a DNA test on me it would come back as a Super Mutt. No matter what she is, she is just darn cute.
  20. Sam I Am

    Terrible news - Hemangiosarcoma

    I am so sorry and know what you are going through. It’s news none of us ever want to hear from our vet but it sounds like Murphy is very much loved and still very much enjoying his life. Dogs have the fortunate aspect on life that they live in the moment and don’t worry about the future. We have lost pets in the past to cancer but not what Murphy has been diagnosed with so can’t comment on that but as long as everyday is as good as the previous one And Murphy still loves his chow and barks at the deer all is well in his life. Big hugs to you and Murphy.
  21. Hillscreek

    Meet Dulce!

    Hello very cute Kyle! Fun times ahead for everyone I'm sure.
  22. SoCal Cairn

    Housebreaking in a highrise

    Hey all. Well it's been about five weeks now and it's been quite the roller-coaster. She's basically house trained now, I also leave a pad out that she'll use occasionally if needed. I haven't been able to get her to use one on the balcony, does anyone else use a pad indoors? The closest grass is 23 stories down and two long blocks away. On the plus side she was crate trained when we got her. Walking her is a nightmare though, it's horrible. I've watch many training videos and tried various methods with little success. It's slowly getting better, but it's rare to not have a confrontation. She'll lock her legs, look at me and refuse to move, it's either a 15 minute stand off or I have to carry her. She's incredibly friendly and wants to meet everyone and every dog she sees pulling on the lease as hard as she can. She'll jump on any dog big or small trying to play, but if they don't respond in a friendly manner, she'll try to rip their throats out. We'll be attending our first training class next week at a chain pet store then a week or so later with an independent (and more expensive) professional. There's also an issue with nipping at our heels but that's only right after a walk when she's all revved up and wants to play. Her energy level is amazing, she'll wrestle with other dogs during a long walk, come home, play with me until I'm exhausted, then run around in circles in the living room and play with her toys for another ten minutes. She seems pretty smart, so far I've trained her (95% of the time) to come, sit, lay down, rollover, stand on her hind legs (this seems to come naturally to her) and with a hand signal, she'll spin while standing. I'm working on, standing on four legs and stay. But this is inside, she's so easily distracted all I've been able to get her to do outside is to come (unless she sees another dog) and sit. My suspicion was correct. My wife insisted we do a DNA test on her, turns out she's 39% Chihuahua , 32% Miniature and Standard Schnauzer. She sure looks like she has more Schnauzer than Chihuahua though, long body and muzzle with mustache and relatively short legs. I think the lab technician got the percentages inverted
  23. Kyles mom

    Meet Dulce!

    Beautiful story but nothing is as dear as a Cavalier boy. They are velcro and tender angels. This little fellow came from, I'm ashamed to say a lying Amish breeder in Ohio and is practically feral! We were told he was home raised but saw he was in a garage and smelled of urine and no socialization or training! We felt like we had to rescue him at that point and he's so dang cute. He's learning fast though.
  24. Four months ago our beloved little 15-year old Cairn Murphy was diagnosed with very mild renal insufficiency, so when he vomited this past Monday we thought it was likely due to that, but, because he didn’t look right, I rushed him in. When our vet x-rayed his abdomen and performed an ultrasound, she found a tumor in his spleen and nodules in his enlarged liver. Most concerning, there was also a small amount of free blood in the abdomen. She transferred us to the veterinary specialty hospital that night and by the next morning the horrific diagnosis was confirmed by an internal medicine specialist. It is presumptive Hemangiosarcoma, one of the most aggressive cancers found in dogs. We are beyond devastated. After much discussion with the vets, we have elected not to have surgery because it would likely only extend his life 2-3 months, and that is only if they were able to safely resect the spleen. The probability of metastases only makes the prognosis worse. We don’t want him to suffer. Murphy is so happy to be home. He is eating well, resting when he feels sleepy, then barking at the deer outside our windows! When it inevitably gets to the point that he appears to be uncomfortable or in pain, our vet will come and put him to rest in his own bed. Please pray for our boy and us. We thought we would have at least another year with him rather than mere days. Our minds are in shock and our hearts in pieces. He is the best little boy we could ever have imagined. Has anyone else had experience with this cancer in a Cairn? Any help and prayers are deeply appreciated ~Murphy’s mom and dad
  25. Teaching a puppy to walk can test your patience. Early days we never make it out of our driveway with all the abrubt turning around direction changes we do each time they hit the end of the lead. I never had much luck with the front-attach harness. I am very familiar with the tangling you describe We tend to use a harness only at the beach or similar where they might be allowed to hit the end of a flexi at full tilt, and that's to prevent injury. (Flexi's are generally terrible for intentional walking with untrained doggos, but at the beach we let them express their exuberance with considerably more latitude.) For that I wouldn't want a front-attach or a regular collar as it would spin them around in a way that might be bad for their neck. Harnesses are good in situations where you might need to snatch the dog up quickly, or you don't mind them pulling. My personal experience has been that it allows and may even teach the dog to pull. Haggis in a sled-pull harness, although that's a particular sport unrelated to walk-about harnesses, to be fair.
  26. there must be cairns who know how to heel. it has to be a very hard thing for them --taking all the cues from a boss is not their way. but they will probably walk happily beside af friend they are proud of.
  27. Kathryn

    Meet Dulce!

    Dulce looks like she has rebounded from her surgery successfully in typical cairn style. I have a "cavalier" story for you: we had a dear neighbor, Vern, who owned a cairn for many many years (named Angus, and our Angus is named in honor of that cairn). Vern was a retired educator and an artist who always had his Angus by his side - they were inseparable. Angus even went to Vern's studio daily, and they walked our neighborhood and down to the Mississippi (just a mile or so from here) every day. Angus lived to a respectable 15 years, and Vern truly grieved him when he was gone. He insisted he would not get another dog at his age, but neighbors found a rescue cavalier in need of a home, and Vern took him in. We ran into the two walking one spring day in a light rain soon after he got the dog, and we asked how well they both were adjusting. And Vern told us, with wonder in his voice, that in a walk in the rain, the "dog gets wet!" He had to towel the dog off -- something he never had to do with his coarse-haired cairn Angus, who just gave a shake and shed the rain easily. When we saw him walking again in the rain a week or so later, the dog had a raincoat. But after that Vern often mentioned his previous "all-weather" dog, and how he now had such a "high maintenance" one..."Dogs should not have to wear clothes," he used to say, shaking his head... We miss him and his dog too.
  28. I also agree with Hillscreek...and with your decision to find a professional groomer for stripping. In the years ahead, it might not always be convenient to get to a groomer, so it's good to know how to do some touch-up grooming/hand stripping yourself. I'm attaching pix of grooming guide. It's not for hand stripping, but gives a good idea of shaping and other info. (I was able to enlarge the type for legibility on my computer screen and assume you can do the same) A groomer once told me that you must only tug 4 hairs at a time to avoid making the dog uncomfortable. I was stunned to imagine how long this would take, but she reassured me that it goes pretty fast as you develop more skill... Whaaat! Hope this helps. Good luck!
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